Love, Death & Robots and the Rise of NSFW Netflix

If you haven’t figured it out by the time you watch a young Hitler being fellated by a Viennese sexuality work, Love, Death& Robots isn’t your average Netflix show.

Of course, if you haven’t figured it out, “youre supposed to” haven’t been paying attention: “Alternate Histories, ” which features said act being play-act upon said icon of immorality, is the 17 th of 18 episodes in the animated collection. By that spot, you’ll have assured full frontal nudity( male, female, and demonic ); you’ll also have considered a zero-G rendition of 127 Hours that deserves every Foley Art award possible, bountiful suppressed heads, and even more bountiful arcing ichorous spews, and a sexuality vistum that looks like the outcome of Cinemax becoming a game developer. You may not want to watch with your boy group lead is all I’m saying.

The anthology, from a crew of executive creators that includes David Fincher and Deadpool director Tim Miller, is a viscerally entertaining( and just plain visceral) conflagration of the senses. It does a great many things is a good one, a few not so well, and takes absolutely nothing earnestly. But more importantly, it signals that Netflix isn’t just paying lip service to the spirit of experimentation. The more naked and gleaming the streaming platform is willing to become, the most urgent its programming will be–and the better it will withstand the coming challenges brought by its competitors.

Netflix’s push into gleeful prurience began in earnest in 2017, with the tweens-in-crisis animated slapstick Big Mouth. Masturbation jokes and talking pubic hair were only the beginning: the next year, anime Devilman Crybaby evolved to hentai-inflected hardcore sexuality and ultraviolence. Yet the two are episodic series; if you were in them, you were in them for the long haul. Love, Death& Robots carves out entirely new floor, its aesthetic and tonal diversification offering up a dip-in approach. You can watch from the beginning, certainly–opener “Sonnie’s Edge” frames an underground fight sorority as a conduit for cathartic retaliation, and “Three Robots” cleanses the palate with sarcastic droids–or you can choose based on an episode’s watch and log line.

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